Gardening Blog - Lush Online Plants Nursery australia

Welcome! We hope you will enjoy our articles about plants, garden care, tropical plants & more. Select a category on the left, or scroll down to start reading! If you are looking for growing information for a specific variety please use the 'search' function below. We'd love to hear your feedback or experience; leave us a comment!

Bush Treasures - The Gumby Gumby Tree

There is something to be said for planting a native tree!  

Over generations they have uniquely adapted to their environment in such a way that success is almost guaranteed.  Being around for a long time, the native trees have revealed their unique properties to Australia's Aboriginal people - who discovered the use, healing properties and food potential of many, many plants and trees and passed down the knowledge through word of mouth.

The Gumby Gumby Tree is one of those trees.  It sports very attractive, weeping willow-like foliage and is slow growing, making this tree suitable for parks and gardens.

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Elephant Garlic / Giant Russian Garlic (Allium ampeloprasum) - the Garlic that’s not a Garlic

8 reasons why you should grow Elephant Garlic

  •  1. It tastes fantastic, a mild combination of 60% garlic and 30% leek,          with 10% onion whisked in.
  •  2. It is easy to grow
  •  3. No need to dig it up or harvest every year. As long as conditions      aren’t too wet, this garlic happily stays in the ground and will spread, all  by itself. 
  •  4. Flowers are stunning, huge, and bee-attracting. I’d grow this plant for      the flowers alone. 
  •  5. It discourages pests, vampires and some humans. The scent is    heaven for garlic lovers.
  •  6. Very productive! You’ll grow enough for you and your family so    everyone has garlic breath
  •  7. You get to have ‘scapes’! Scapes is some unmentionable medical    condition, but rather a delicious, new vegetable you may not have used    before. (scroll down for definition)
  •  8. It is big! Elephant Garlic grows as big as a man’s fist, up to 10cm wide  and 500g each.

 

Are you growing Elephant Garlic? Please share your experience by leaving a comment below! To buy Elephant Garlic online, visit: Buy Elephant Garlic for Australia

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Native Australian Kurrajong Tree (Bottle Tree, Brachychiton populneus) - edible, useful, hardy & versatile.

Buy Kurrajong Trees online

Bottle Tree / Kurrajong (Brachychiton populneus) Introduction

Australian native, extremely drought hardy tree. Grows 5-15m tall. Edible seeds, leaves, flowers & roots - roast the seeds and grind into flour, make coffee out of them, or make nets from the fibrous bark and catch some fish. Bird & Insect attracting. Very easy to grow and suitable for just about any position. Suitable as wind break, cattle fodder, pot plant, feature tree, street tree, shade tree, this tree has got it all! Frost hardy to -5.

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Happy Zygo Cactus!

Buy Peachy Pink Zygo Cactus Online for Australia

As a seasonal greeting, that’s not going to catch on, is it? How about if I tell you that the common name for Zygocactus is Christmas Cactus. There, it all makes sense now!

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Brazilian Plume Flower (Justicia Carnea)

 Justicia Carnea is a rewarding plant to grow, being fairly tolerant and relatively hardy. It is a healthy plant with vibrant pink leaves and a host of other names tucked under its bright pink belt-also known as Flamingo Plant, Shrimp Flower and Brazilian Plume Flower among others, this striking beauty will add bright splashes of colour wherever you plant it.

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Amazing Acalypha

Growing Acalypha Plants-Firestorm and Raggedy Ann

 

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Dracaena Compacta-Dragons in Your Sitting Room!

Dracaena Compacta

Dracaena Compacta is a type of houseplant-one of the best to give a present, as it is notoriously difficult to kill! The Latin based name Dracaena Compacta means “Female “Dragon” but you won’t have to worry about this well behaved little plant burning down your conservatory-the name describes the shape of the leaves and not the temperament of this houseplant.

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HIbiscus Insularis-Philip Island Hibiscus

Hibiscus Insularis - Philip Island Hibiscus

Hibiscus Insularis is also known as Philip Island Hibiscus, due to its’ being found in only ONE spot in the wild (can you guess where?)

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Lemon Scented Geranium

Lemon Scented Geranium (Pellargonium Citronellum)

It may surprise you to know that the Lemon Scented Geranium is not actually a Geranium at all. It comes from a related family, the Pelargonium family, which are a genus of sweet smelling plants. Sweeter than most in fact, as Pelargonium have a huge variety of different scents-they range from Lemon to Rose to Coconut to Chocolate and Lime. The smell is caused by chemicals in the leaves, similar to those in herbs, which makes their leaves scented and in some cases suitable for culinary use.

The Pelargonium Citronellum, or Lemon Scented Geranium, is a particularly strong smelling, refreshing plant. Its large, pointed leaves are covered with tiny hairs which, when bruised or rubbed, release a delicious lemon smell, so you can close your eyes and pretend you’re walking through a grove of lemon trees. (Or floating in a Gin and Tonic, whichever you prefer.)

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Dracaena Colorama

Buy Dracaena Online

Dracaena Colorama Brightens the Day

The Dracaena Colorama is the kind of plant everybody loves. If you put a Dracaena ‘Colorama’ in your living space, not only will it brighten your day with gorgeous hues but it will basically survive on its own. In the garden, she’s just as strong and also incredibly carefree. The meaning for ‘Dracaena’ suggests ‘female dragon’ and the exciting frond-like flares are often trimmed along the reptilian trunk which gives the tuft atop a dragon-head effect.

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